The Wonder Show presents contemporary reinterpretations of the Victorian popular art form of the   magic lantern show that once entertained and educated audiences before the beginning of cinema. In creating contemporary magic lantern shows, we are interested in exploring collaborative storytelling processes between artists, performers, writers, cultural institutions, and everyday people.

Our goals:
• Discover new forms of multimedia story-telling
• Connect the public to historic materials: stories, photographs, and technologies.
• Experiment with different optical technologies and techniques
• Engage broad and diverse communities

The Wonder Show is Laura Brown-Lavoie, Carolyn Gennari, and Jeremy Radtke.

Laura Brown-Lavoie
Laura is a spoken word poet from Providence, RI. She is a nationally published fiction and nonfiction writer, who has received several awards and commendations for her work. When she isn’t writing, Laura works as an urban farmer, growing food on two vacant lots in Providence, and selling the produce to her neighbors at the Armory Park farmer’s market and to local restaurants.

Carolyn Gennari
Carolyn is interested in the ways in which our visual experiences shape and develop the ways in which we understand the world around us. Currently, she is focused on how Victorian optical devices can provide a case study for how individuals experienced visual culture during the 19thcentury. She has worked within several cultural institutions doing work as a docent, curator, and researcher and is excited by work that involves community interpretation and collaboration.

Jeremy Radtke
Jeremy Radtke is an artist and educator focused on the intersection of art and technology. Working within both digital and physical public spaces, his work often invokes nostalgic tendencies that look at old and new technologies and ways of making that allow for audience participation and play.

Emeritus: Anya Ventura
Anya is a writer, educator, and cultural producer based in Providence, RI. Previously she has lived in Hong Kong, Taipei, Rotterdam, and Chicago. Her work often intersects public history and contemporary art to explore media, history, memory, and place.

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